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February 5, 2018 |
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Diversity Managers: 10 Key Job Skills, Salary, and Required Education

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Managing a diverse workforce has become vital in a globalized business world. Diversity Managers and human resources professionals with related skills are in demand. According to Tech Republic:

While chief diversity and equality officers were rare a decade ago, today, about one in five Fortune 1000 companies have one. Airbnb, Dropbox, Pinterest, and Twitter have all filled diversity manager positions [Sept. 2016 – Sept. 2017].

The median salary for diversity managers is $77K a year and higher for leadership positions: sometimes called Diversity VPs, Diversity Recruiting Managers, or Diversity and Inclusion Officers.

Helping put an end to cultures of white privilege, sexual harassment, disability, and religious discrimination can be part of the motivation that brings people to this career. For many, a diversity management career is part of a larger passion to demonstrate the positive effects of ethical human resource practices on company outcomes. The field is dynamic and constantly changing. Managing Gender Transition in the Workplace is the most recent frontier in ensuring safety and equality among workers. For many, a diversity management career is part of a larger passion to demonstrate the positive effects of ethical human resource practices on company outcomes.

10 Diversity Job Skills

To be successful in this field, management-level diversity experts have to apply these 10 key job skills.

1. Recruiting

To succeed against global competition, companies must look beyond their own local areas and national boundaries for key resources and new markets. Globalization represents a tipping point for diversity company practices. According to Dr. Marianne Koch, Chair of GGU’s Human Resources degree programs, recruiting an international team or coordinating with an office in, say, Mumbai or Dublin, Ireland, is an important contribution a diversity manager can make.

This offshoring is also affecting the development of HR software. CIO’s senior writer contributed an excellent article on how human resource software startups, such as Jopwell, are promising that their solutions will help release pent-up diversity resources in the job market and let companies reap the business benefits of a diverse workforce. Public recognition of a company’s commitment to diversity can attract more candidates, in the case of top-ranked EY and second-place Kaiser Permanente, which is led by African-American and GGU Graduate Bernard J. Tyson.

2. Implementing a Diversity Initiative

Managing diversity requires a well thought out plan, crafted to fit specific organizational needs and conditions. The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) describes the main phases of a diversity initiative as data collection, strategy-design to match business objectives, implementation, evaluation, and continuing audit of outcomes. For example, the Chief Diversity and Inclusion officer at SAP developed a three- to five-year corporate diversity strategy, focusing on, “gender intelligence, generational intelligence, cultures and identity, and differently-abled or disabled people.”

3. Data-Driven Practices

“For human resources professionals, data-driven results get the attention of the C-Suite,” says Dr. Koch. “It is a must for executive-level diversity experts.” Ji-A Min, head data scientist for Ideal.com, a company bringing AI to human resources software, says that the mandate for a diversity or equality officer is to “identify quantifiable, measurable diversity KPIs…for example… [to] equalize the pay between male and female employees of the same tenure, level, and performance within three months [and] demonstrate the ROI of workplace diversity by linking diversity data to business outcomes such as increased revenue.” Software solutions such as Payscale promise retention outcomes from data-driven salary management and can be used to analyze a diverse workforce. A Diversity Manager who can demonstrate quantitative results will be a step ahead of the competition.

 4. Communication

By many accounts, communication is the number-one skill needed in business, and this is particularly true in diversity management. This is a matter of language, nonverbal communication, personal physical space, religious convictions, or sexual or gender identity.

5. Leadership and Management

Diversity Managers have increasing responsibility and are often brought in at the VP level. Dr. Koch says: “Leading a diverse workforce requires knowledge of who one’s workers are and how they perceive themselves and want others to acknowledge them. An awareness of these things will bring out the best in the workforce as workers feel accepted and legitimate. It sets the tone, as well, for a culture of inclusion and respect.”

6. Training

Many companies choose to implement Learning and Development programs online. One sophisticated option is Law Room, which goes beyond a dry webinar or PowerPoint presentation and includes video scenarios–and invites trainees to reflect on what they have seen. It also dives into the complexities of reacting to a report of harassment that is consistent with the law and the experience of the reporting party. Live training opportunities are abundant in the San Francisco Bay area including the well-established Paradigm Consulting Group that provides ethics and compliance training.

7. Counseling and Advising

Interpersonal — sometimes included among “soft” skills — are in high demand for this career. Job sites such as Glassdoor and LinkedIn often list “counseling” and “advising” as necessary skills. Transitions are unsettling, and those of the old guard may need help adjusting their attitudes, behaviors, and practices to the newly diverse workplace. At the same time, new entrants into the workforce need support and encouragement. In fact, implementing Diversity Mentoring programs, according to Scientific American, can be one of the most successful ways to increase the amount of African-American, Latino / Latina, Asian (female and male), and white female managers at an organization—potentially by almost 40 percent.

8. Knowing the Law

Legal and regulatory changes happen every year at the federal, state, and even local levels. In California, new 2017 regulations regarding transgender identity and expression include staff training. Companies with the best of intentions can still fail to meet their legal obligations unless they monitor changes and plan how to put them into practice.

9. Knowing One’s Prejudices

James Wright, a Diversity and Inclusion Strategist, lists self-awareness as one of the Five Things to Know before Building a Career in Diversity and Inclusion. “Bias is a part of the human anatomy,” he says, citing the book Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People as valuable research.

10. Responding to Innovation

Innovation is often listed as a competency for Diversity Managers because they need to keep up how work is accomplished in a changing world — and how a diverse workforce is deployed to support strategic goals. Dr. Koch even gives the examples of working side-by-side with R2D2-like “nurses” that bring patients meds or the electronic sentinels at the new Amazon Go stores.

What education is needed?

Certificates and boot camps are always an option for getting your feet wet, but for executive or management positions, a master’s degree in human resources is often required.

 

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Recently, GGU hosted a speaker, Adam Foss, who enjoys a reputation as an important and critical voice on criminal justice reform. Since then, it has come to our attention that he has been accused of sexual violence and other harassing behaviors that have been hurtful and damaging to women.

Had we known about these accusations—none from within GGU—we would not have selected him as a speaker.

We can’t undo that. But we can state unequivocally that behavior of this nature is anathema to our values, and that people who engage in it are not welcome at GGU. The #MeToo movement continues to expose the distressingly widespread nature of sexual harassment, violence, and abuse, and the time for indifference and silence has long passed.

An investigation has begun into the allegations. Meanwhile, we cannot reinforce a system where women, men, and others with stories of abuse and predatory behavior remain silent because they are afraid to come forward. No one should be subject to an imbalance where their voices are judged less important than those who hold power.

This news is deeply disappointing to those who helped organize this event and those who participated in it. Going forward, we will work to ensure that guests to GGU clearly understand and acknowledge our values in advance, and that we strive to maintain an inclusive and safe environment for our community.
... See MoreSee Less

Recently, GGU hosted a speaker, Adam Foss, who enjoys a reputation as an important and critical voice on criminal justice reform. Since then, it has come to our attention that he has been accused of sexual violence and other harassing behaviors that have been hurtful and damaging to women.

Had we known about these accusations—none from within GGU—we would not have selected him as a speaker.

We can’t undo that. But we can state unequivocally that behavior of this nature is anathema to our values, and that people who engage in it are not welcome at GGU. The #MeToo movement continues to expose the distressingly widespread nature of sexual harassment, violence, and abuse, and the time for indifference and silence has long passed. 

An investigation has begun into the allegations. Meanwhile, we cannot reinforce a system where women, men, and others with stories of abuse and predatory behavior remain silent because they are afraid to come forward. No one should be subject to an imbalance where their voices are judged less important than those who hold power.

This news is deeply disappointing to those who helped organize this event and those who participated in it. Going forward, we will work to ensure that guests to GGU clearly understand and acknowledge our values in advance, and that we strive to maintain an inclusive and safe environment for our community.

Today marks the 21st Transgender Day of Remembrance, an annual observance that honors the memory of transgender people whose lives were lost to anti-transgender violence, an epidemic that disproportionately affects transgender people-of-color.

This year, the Human Rights Campaign has reported at least 37 violent deaths of transgender and gender nonconforming people, the deadliest year on record. However, many other incidents may be unreported or misreported.

Let's take a moment of silence for those lives lost.

Learn more about the history of TDOR: ow.ly/4DeI50CqNjJ

📷 : "George" Larcher
... See MoreSee Less

Today marks the 21st Transgender Day of Remembrance, an annual observance that honors the memory of transgender people whose lives were lost to anti-transgender violence, an epidemic that disproportionately affects transgender people-of-color.

This year, the Human Rights Campaign has reported at least 37 violent deaths of transgender and gender nonconforming people, the deadliest year on record. However, many other incidents may be unreported or misreported.

Lets take a moment of silence for those lives lost.

Learn more about the history of TDOR: http://ow.ly/4DeI50CqNjJ

📷   :  George Larcher

Meet Amy Kweskin, GGU instructor in the School of Undergraduate Studies.

What is your educational and professional background?

I have 2 BAs from Ithaca College in Cinema and Photography and English Literature, and I graduated from GGU in Arts Administration in 1997. Now I’m a doctoral student at GGU in Business Administration. My professional background is fashion marketing and management as well as the management of arts organizations. I consult in strategic planning for orchestras, gallery spaces, festivals, theater and dance companies.

What do you like about teaching at GGU?

I love teaching at GGU. Students bring real life experience from a variety of career paths and they benefit from classroom learning that’s practical, applicable, and immediately implementable. It’s not theory we teach, but practice. Our students have complex lives with families, school, and work. It’s different from any other school at which I've taught. Our students are mature and they’re committed to earning their degree. They challenge me in really good ways. They don’t just take my word, they really process it and dive into topics. They’re always willing to go above and beyond the requirements.

What is it like teaching teaching online?

GGU was ahead of the curve in terms of transitioning to online classes. Still, it was a huge transition. It's very important that we develop rapport, so I allow time to check in. We spend time talking about where students are physically or anything they want to share so that we build community. I make weekly Zoom classes highly engaging with breakout rooms and activities that enable students to collaborate together on-screen. I strive to engage all learning modalities. I'm very available so they can call, text, or email me. I make myself available to listen. That's important.
... See MoreSee Less

Meet Amy Kweskin, GGU instructor in the School of Undergraduate Studies.

What is your educational and professional background?

I have 2 BAs from Ithaca College in Cinema and Photography and English Literature, and I graduated from GGU in Arts Administration in 1997. Now I’m a doctoral student at GGU in Business Administration.  My professional background is fashion marketing and management as well as the management of arts organizations. I consult in strategic planning for orchestras, gallery spaces, festivals, theater and dance companies.

What do you like about teaching at GGU?

I love teaching at GGU. Students bring real life experience from a variety of career paths and they benefit from classroom learning that’s practical, applicable, and immediately implementable. It’s not theory we teach, but practice. Our students have complex lives with families, school, and work. It’s different from any other school at which Ive taught. Our students are mature and they’re committed to earning their degree. They challenge me in really good ways. They don’t just take my word, they really process it and dive into topics. They’re always willing to go above and beyond the requirements.

What is it like teaching teaching online?

GGU was ahead of the curve in terms of transitioning to online classes. Still, it was a huge transition. Its very important that we develop rapport, so I allow time to check in. We spend time talking about where students are physically or anything they want to share so that we build community.  I make weekly Zoom classes highly engaging with breakout rooms and activities that enable students to collaborate together on-screen. I strive to engage all learning modalities. Im very available so they can call, text, or email me. I make myself available to listen. Thats important.

There is still time to register for today's show...Stories are universal and core to who we are as humans. So why are they so rarely used in the business world? In this upcoming GGU Presents, Marc Singer talks with management consultant and GGU Adjunct Professor Larry Ebert about why storytelling is an incredibly powerful, but underused, form of communication for leaders in business and how we can mine our internal stories to clarify values and move and shape teams and the world.

That's this Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. Register for free here: ow.ly/YwQs50Cli79
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There is still time to register for todays show...

Is vegan butter "butter?" The California Department of Food and Agriculture says no. But Miyoko’s Creamery, an all-vegan creamery, recently sued the state over that and other product-labeling issues—and won. It's one of many challenges the Sonoma food company has faced. This week, join founder Miyoko Schinner and GGU Visiting Associate Professor of Law Lucas Williams in a discussion of her company’s beginnings, challenges, and victories along the way. Her recent win against the state is a victory not only for her product label, but also animal rights, plant-based products, and women- and minority-owned businesses.

That's Thursday at noon on GGU Presents.

Register here: www.eventbrite.com/e/spread-the-love-and-the-vegan-butter-tickets-127239654231
... See MoreSee Less

Is vegan butter butter? The California Department of Food and Agriculture says no. But Miyoko’s Creamery, an all-vegan creamery, recently sued the state over that and other product-labeling issues—and won. Its one of many challenges the Sonoma food company has faced. This week, join founder Miyoko Schinner and GGU Visiting Associate Professor of Law Lucas Williams in a discussion of her company’s beginnings, challenges, and victories along the way. Her recent win against the state is a victory not only for her product label, but also animal rights, plant-based products, and women- and minority-owned businesses.

Thats Thursday at noon on GGU Presents.

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/spread-the-love-and-the-vegan-butter-tickets-127239654231
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